Execution Dock

execution dock by Tarquin Binary
execution dock by Tarquin Binary

Those found guilty of piracy were once taken to Execution Dock along the Thames for a very public and painful death by hanging. The corpses were  then chained to a stake and held in place until three tides had washed over them. The most famous pirate to reach his end at Execution Dock was Captain Kidd who was found guilty of murder and piracy in 1701. His body was tarred and displayed in an iron cage hung over the River Thames as a warning to others. The actual location of Execution Dock is disputed, but a reminder can be found behind the historic Prospect of Whitby Pub in Wapping.

THE BEST HONEY IN LONDON

Best Honey In London
Best Honey In London

The Hive Honey Shop in Battersea was recently awarded ‘The Best Honey in London’ at the 2013 London Honey Show. Visitors to the award-winning honey shop can choose from over 700 products including fine honeys, beeswax candles, royal jelly, cakes, sweets, and cosmetics. Visitors can also ‘gaze into the secret world of the honey bee’ through a 5-ft high, glass-fronted beehive filled with 20,000 live bees. James Hamill, head beekeeper and owner of The Hive Honey Shop, has had bee-keeping running in his family since the 1920s, and his shop is filled with family heirlooms as well as other bee related items he has collected throughout the years. Look for the ‘world’s largest honey stirrer’ on display as Mr. Hamill attempts to break a new Guinness World Record (www.thisislocallondon.co.uk)

The Hive Honey Shop
93 Northcote Road, SW11 6PL

London’s Roman Amphitheatre

Did you know? A 2,000 year-old Roman gladiator ring was buried under the streets of London for centuries. Once a venue for wild animal fights, public executions and gladiatorial combats, London’s only Roman amphitheater was discovered in 1988 by group of archeologists from the Museum of London during a dig in preparation for the new Art Gallery building at Guildhall Yard. Today, the surviving remains are open to the public and displayed in a protected and controlled environment within the new Art Gallery. Visitors to the site can step into a 2,000 year-old gladiator ring and view a stretch of the stone entrance tunnel, east gate, and arena walls. The original extent of the outer wall is marked by a circle of black paving stones located outside the building in Guildhall Yard.

London’s Roman Amphitheatre
Guildhall Art Gallery EC2V 5AE
www.cityoflondon.gov.uk